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Category Archives: Music Industry

Carole King’s Personal Piano Up for Auction

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The piano has always been a part of singer-songwriter Carole King’s legacy, and now a lucky bidder can share a part of that legacy. King’s 1924 Model M Steinway will be auctioned April 20 in New York City as part of Exceptional Sale at Christie’s.
The mahogany piano, which King used to compose several songs, is featured on the cover of her albums “Music” (1971) and “Sweet Seasons” (also 1971).
King, who first sat at a piano at age 4 and began composing hits at age 17 with her then-husband, Gerry Goffin, is celebrated in the Broadway musical “Beautiful.”
From the first King-Goffin hits such as the Shirelles’ “Will You Love Me Tomorrow,” Little Eva’s “The Loco-Motion” and the Drifters’ “Up on the Roof,” through King’s songs that she performed, including “It’s Too Late,” (“You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman” and “So Far Away,” they were the soundtrack of a generation.
“Beautiful: The Carole King Musical” opened in January 2014 and features dozens of hits. It was a 2015 Grammy award winner for Best Musical Theater Album.
Chilina Kennedy, who plays King in “Beautiful,” said her music is typical of the collaborative spirit of artists in the 1960s and ’70s. King typified that collaborative spirit with “You’ve Got a Friend,” a song she gifted to the young, relatively unknown James Taylor, who made it an iconic hit.
Christie’s Exceptional Sales are dedicated to pop culture icons; previous sales have included a World War II airplane and an original Apple computer.
The piano’s estimated value is $40,000 to $60,000. King is selling it because she is also selling her Idaho ranch to downsize, Architectural Digest said.

Cranberries to Release New Album, 25th Anniversary Project

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Irish indie-rock band The Cranberries continue to work on two projects, a new album and a 25th anniversary re-release of their debut album, following the death of singer Dolores O’Riordan, the band announced.
O’Riordan had recorded vocals for tracks and emailed them to guitarist Noel Hogan three days before her death.
The band said March 7 that the album, The Cranberries’ first in six years, has been in the works since last year.
The 25th anniversary project, a reissue of “Everybody Else Is Doing It So Why Can’t We,” will include remastered tracks as well as previously unreleased songs, the band announced on its website.
Band members in addition to Hogan are Mike Hogan and Fergal Lawlor.
They have not yet revealed anything about what the new songs might be like.
The band formed in Limerick City, Ireland, in 1990 and sold over 40 million albums, with hits including “Linger,” “How,” “Zombie” and “Dreams.”
The most recent album, in 2017, was “Something Else,” which included covers of hits recorded with the Irish Chamber Orchestra. It offered a take on the classics that was more acoustic than rock, as well as three new songs.
While the Cranberries, especially O’Riordan, gave young women a voice that was fragile, but was also “both beautiful and fierce,” according to The New York Times, their Irishness has also helped to define them, particularly after “Zombie,” a 1993 protest song written about two young victims of an IRA bombing.
O’Riordan, 46, was found dead in her hotel room Jan. 15 in London. A studio session had been booked for that day. No cause of death has been released. Authorities said it was not suspicious, but no official ruling is expected to be announced until April.

Long Albums in the Music Industry are Now Trending

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Unless you’re living under a rock, then you’ve noticed that there’s a new trend in the music industry. Albums are becoming insanely long. The number of tracks, and consequently the album lengths, are something that music lovers have long dreamed of. From Migos’ “Culture II” containing 24 tracks lasting one hour and 46 minutes to Chris Brown’s “Heartbreak on a Full Moon” containing an astounding 45 tracks lasting two hours and 38 minutes, fans are getting more for their money. Or are they?

It’s becoming evident that artists are utilizing a greater number of songs on albums as a way to boost numbers that lead to album certifications and placements on the music charts. Billboard and the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) both use particular criteria to determine qualification. This process has become more complicated now that streaming has become popular. This is where the strategy behind these super-long albums comes into play. To count as an album sale by Billboard and the RIAA, there must be one album purchased, 10 songs downloaded or 1,500 songs streamed. Since users streaming songs even count when the platform is ad-supported and not requiring the user to pay for the service, essentially everyone can take part in an artist’s album sale figures. Artists are maximizing their resources and they can see dividends as it’s well-known that an artist’s worth is often determined by how many times they’ve had a number-one hit and the number of gold and platinum certifications received. So sorry fans if you thought your favorite artist was trying to give you more bang for your buck. Even though they’ll get the highly-coveted figures, you’ll still get a load of music. So I’d call this a win-win.